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Dateline: Events/Headlines – Week Of April 8, 1970 In News, Pop Culture, Tech, Celebrity, Sports, Entertainment & Fascinating Facts

 

 

 

In The News

Tampa – U.S. Dist. Judge Ben Krentzman fines Gov Claude Kirk Jr. guilty of civil contempt for defying court school integration orders. 

The Senate rebuffs President Nixon by vetoing his second successive Supreme Court nomination – that of Harrold Carswell.

Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell hires a press secretary for his outspoken wife, Martha, as an aftermath of her latest verbal foray into public print. She had asked the Arkansas Gazette to “crucify” Sen. J.W. Fulbright (D-Ark.) for his vote against confirmation of Judge G. Harrold Carswell to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The nation’s jobless level reaches a 5-year high with a million more workers out of jobs now than when President Nixon took office 15 months ago.

The South Vietnamese command has clamped down on news coverage of border developments, barring newsmen from some areas along the Cambodian frontier and refusing to let them go into the field with certain government forces.

New York City mayor John Lindsay who just offered a new income tax program to help meet a $1 billion deficit, asks for two new taxes that would affect all city motorists. The mayor requests permission to impose a $10 annual fee on all motor vehicles that are owned or maintained I the city.

After a three-hour deliberation, a grand jury abandoned its day-old inquiry into the death of Mary Jo Kopechne in a car driven by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. “The case is closed.”

President Nixon greets about 30 TV producers at a daylong White House conference on drug abuse. He said television and radio have an enormous impact on the younger generation. “The power in this room can make the difference in the story of dope.” The President said he realizes there must be entertainment and there is competition I the industry, but he suggested there could be programs which catch the interest of young people and at the same time, get the message across. 

Passing – Novelist John O’Hara. He was 65.

In Arkansas - David Eisenhower tells a Youth Council he wouldn’t discuss the Carswell-Supreme Court controversy because anything he might say would only be “a pale imitation of Martha Mitchell.”  Ms. Mitchell had called an Arkansas paper saying it was a “damn shame” that Sen. J.W. Fullbright (D-Ark.) had voted against confirmation of Judge C. Harrold Carswell to the court.

With a substitute pilot – Apollo 13 makes a nice blast-off from Cape Kennedy. Hours later, substitute command module pilot John Swigert docked the spacecraft Odyssey with the landing vehicle Aquarius. Meanwhile, having been exposed to the measles, Thomas Mattingly, who was supposed to be the pilot, has been told by a doctor he’ll probably get the measles this week. 

Spectators at Cape Kennedy – Vice President Agnew and West German Chancellor Willy Brandt.

Mrs. Marilyn Lovell, who has watched her husband rocket into space on four occasions, says the Apollo 13 launch was the most beautiful she has seen, but she was glad it was Lovell’s last. 

 

 Sports news – April 8, 1970

Juan Marichal will remain in St. Luke’s Hospital at least until the weekend after he had an allergic reaction to penicillin given him to combat an ear infection.

Sandy Koufax, the legendary southpaw and now a sportscaster says he doesn’t understand the reasoning behind the ruling handed down by commissioner Bowie Kuhn in the Denny McLain case. Koufax, interviewed on NBC radio’s “Monitor” weekend program, said the suspension meted out to McLain until July 1 for betting on basketball games and attempting to become a bookmaker was “either too harsh or not enough.” “Either he’s guilty or not guilty. It’s sort of like saying half-pregnant. All the years I played, gambling was the prime sin. Ever since the Black sox scandal that was the one thing you didn’t even talk about as far as baseball was concerned.”

 

Radio news – April 8, 1970

Wolfman Jack is on the prowl and doing very well thank you on XERB (1090 AM) – a Tijuana station beaming to all of Southern California and beyond at night. The Wolfman does a lot of concerts under the Promotion Associates banner. “Take a town like Modesto. We rent a facility like the fairgrounds for $600 and we make two or three thousand, understand what I mean?” says the Wolfman. The station plays r&b, but Wolfman says that hop people of all colors comprise his audience. “Record promoters don’t seem to understand that black people like the same hits that whites do. If the Beatles have a big record out, it’s No. 1 with the blacks too. I found this out when I took the first survey of all record stores.”

 

 Music news – April 8, 1970

Paul McCartney breaks up the Beatles and withdraws from the group to concentrate on his solo career. He made official what had been increasingly apparent in recent months: close as brothers when they were struggling in small nightclubs, the foursome had acquired too many other interests along with wealth and world acclaim. His solo album, “McCartney,” is to be released this week (Friday). 

Sammy Davis Jr. and Motown’s Berry Gordy Jr. announce the formation of a new music industry complex – Ecology Records and involved are music publishing and record companies with future planning to include pictures and television. Davis assumes the top creative post in the alignment. He is also the first artist to sign an exclusive deal with Ecology.  First album – “Sammy Davis Jr. at Carnegie Hall – Live.” (editor’s note) – this didn’t go anywhere as only one other record - a single would be released under this label – by Sammy Davis Jr.  

 

Top pop hit music singles(top-40) USA – April 8, 1970

Let It Be – The Beatles

ABC – Jackson 5

Spirit in the Sky – Norman Greenbaum

Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Grows) – Edison Lighthouse

Easy Come, Easy Go – Bobby Sherman

The Rapper – Jaggerz

Bridge over Troubled Water – Simon and Garfunkle

Instant Karma – John Lennon

House of the Rising Sun – Frijid Pink

Come and Get It – Badfinger

Vehicle – Ides of March

Everything is Beautiful – Ray Stevens

Love or Let Me Be Lonely – Friends of Distinction

Something’s Burning – Kenny Rogers & The First Edition

Little Green Bag – George Baker Selection

 

Entertainment/Celebrity news – April 8, 1970

Dick Smothers, half of the Smothers Brothers, says he’s ready to race professionally. His first professional race is this week at Riverside International Raceway in the 14-race Continental Grand Prix series (formula cars).

42nd annual Oscars –

Best picture – “Midnight Cowboy”

Best actor – John Wayne  - “True Grit”

Best actress – Maggie Smith – “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie”

Best directing – John Schlesinger – “Midnight Cowboy”

Best song – “Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head” from Butch Cassidy. Music by Burt Bacharach. Lyrics by Hal David.

 

 

Playing in Las Vegas –

Nancy Wilson, Godfrey Cambridge – Caesars Palace

Connie Stevens, John Rowles – Flamingo

 Robert Goulet – Frontier

Tiny Tim – Fremont

Gene Kelly – International

Danny Thomas – Sands

Don Rickles – Sahara

 

Television news – April 8, 1970

Sesame Street, the educational television series for preschool children, will return for a second season in October in at least 200 cities.

Returns to TV - Dinah Shore will return as the hostess of Dinah’s Place.

 

Wednesday night television listings/programs/TV guide – April 8, 1970

CBS – Hee Haw, Beverly Hillbillies, Medical Center, Hawaii Five-O, Merv Griffin

NBC – The Virginian, Kraft Music Hall, Then Came Bronson, Tonight

ABC – Nanny and the Professor, Courtship of Eddie’s father, Room 222, Johnny Cash Show, Engelbert Humperdinck, Dick Cavett

Educational – Book Beat , International Magazine

 

Hee Haw – George Jones and his wife, Tammy Wynette guest.

Courtship of Eddie’s Father – Tom Corbitt tries a computer dating service, but finds his “match’ enjoys the things he doesn’t.

Johnny Cash – Patti Page, Sony James and Toni Jo White. 

 
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